America's independent, non-partisan advocate for overburdened taxpayers.

Vote Alert


NTU urges all Senators to vote as follows on S. Con. Res. 8:
Part VII

March 22, 2013


***This is the seventh of several communications to the Senate NTU intends to make during the course of the budget debate***

As the Senate considers S. Con. Res. 8, the Concurrent Resolution on the Budget for Fiscal Year 2014, NTU urges all Senators to vote as follows:

“YES” on Coburn Amendments #401, #402, #403, #404, #405: Together these amendments consolidate numerous duplicative federal programs.
“YES” on Coburn Amendment #406: This amendment would prohibit unemployment payments for individuals with an annual gross income (AGI) of over $1 million.
“YES” on Coburn Amendment #407: This amendment would reduce Social Security payments for individuals with an AGI of over $1 million.
“YES” on Coburn Amendment #408: This amendment would prevent the use of the enhanced FMAP for Medicaid expansion under PPACA.
“YES” on Coburn Amendment #409: This amendment eliminates a PPACA provision that creates a state-by-state disparity in payments to hospitals.
“YES” on Coburn Amendment #410: This amendment would allow Health Savings Accounts to count as a qualified health plan under PPACA.
“YES” on Coburn Amendment #413: This amendment would reform the FCC’s Lifeline program to require minimal payments from subsidized cell phone recipients.
“YES” on Coburn Amendment #416: This amendment would end non-defense spending at the Defense Department.
“YES” on Coburn Amendment #417: This amendment would reduce the income-threshold for insurance subsidies in PPACA from 400 percent to 300 percent of the federal poverty level.
“YES” on Coburn Amendment #418: This amendment would achieve the
same $630 billion of health care savings over ten years as outlined in the Bowles-Simpson plan.
“YES” on Coburn Amendment #420: This amendment would eliminate overlapping Social Security Disability Insurance payments and Unemployment Insurance payments.
“YES” on Coburn Amendment #422: This amendment establishes a database for every unclassified report submitted to Congress.
“YES” on Paul Amendment #376: This amendment would implement the REINS Act, giving Congress authority over the major rulemaking proposals of executive agencies.
“YES” on Alexander-Vitter Amendment #523: This amendment would repeal both the wind power tax credit and medical device tax.
“YES” on Roberts Amendment #182: This amendment would reform the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program saving taxpayers $36 billion.
“YES” on Portman Amendment #152: This amendment would reduce the deficit by $63.86 billion.
“YES” on Portman Amendment #154: This amendment would require the Congressional Budget Office to include macroeconomic feedback in scoring of tax legislation.
“YES” on Portman Amendment #155: This amendment would repeal S. Con. Res. 8’s tax increases and tax reconciliation instructions and replace them with legislation to cut corporate tax rates.
“YES” on Grassley Amendment #156: This amendment would protect taxpayers from a $1 trillion tax increase and provide for comprehensive tax reform.
“YES” on Ayotte Amendment #136: This amendment would prohibit the funding of the unnecessary and unwanted Medium Extended Air Defense System (MEADS).
“YES” on Ayotte Amendment #161: This amendment would require the full auditability of the financial statements of the Department of Defense by 2017.
 “YES” on Coats Amendment #194: This amendment would repeal the 3.8 percent tax on investment income imposed by PPACA.
“YES” on Coats Amendment #196: This amendment would create a point of order against legislation that would increase net direct spending when the national debt exceeds the size of the economy of the United States.
“YES” on Flake Amendment #225: This amendment would prohibit earmarks.
 “YES” on Inhofe Amendment #279: This amendment would prevent the Department of Health and Human Services from waiving Federal work requirements for TANF.
“YES” on Wicker Amendment #317: This amendment would create a point of order against any budget resolution containing greater projected spending on net interest than on national defense.
“YES” on Vitter Amendment #336: This amendment would end automatic pay raises for Members of Congress.
“YES” on Vitter Amendment #338: This amendment would end the Lifeline mobile phone welfare program.
“YES” on Risch Amendment #386: This amendment would replace Medicaid and Children’s Health Insurance program with a block grant to the states.
“YES” on Lee Amendment #374: This amendment would phase out the Export-Import Bank.
“YES” on Toomey Amendment #399: This amendment would repeal the tax increase on catastrophic medical expenses created by PPACA.
“YES” on Lee Amendment #446: This amendment would end all energy subsidies.


“NO” on Coburn Amendment #414: This amendment would raise taxes on a handful of specific associations. The tax code should not be used to pick winners and losers; rather the repeal of any deductions or credits should be done in the context of comprehensive tax reform that creates a flatter, fairer tax code for all.
“NO” on Sanders Amendment #440: This amendment would increase spending and the price of energy by establishing policies that favor renewable energy over traditional fuel sources.

Roll call votes on the above amendments to S. Con. Res. 8 will be included in our annual Rating of Congress.

If you have any questions, please contact NTU Federal Affairs Manager Nan Swift at (703) 683-5700