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More Big Ethanol



November 8, 2010

In today's Examiner, Tim Carney argues that ending Big Ethanol's subsidies is an early test of their commitment to free markets and smaller government.  With the subsidies set to expire at the end of this year, you can never say never.  However, ethanol has hung around Washington for more than 30 years.  During the 1970s, ethanol was billed as the answer to America's energy crisis. During the 1980s, it was expected to save the family farm from financial ruin. During the 1990s, ethanol was touted for its environmental benefits.  Whatever problem Washington seems to be facing, ethanol seems to be the answer.  And, as Carney rightly points out, the industry has a lot of friends on Capitol Hill.  If Republicans can end subsidies to Big Ethanol, it would be an important accomplishment and demonstrate their commitment to reforming Washington.


 

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Submitted by cookiemonster at: November 24, 2010
End ethanol subsidies and tarrifs on imported ethanol.

Submitted by bobeye at: November 24, 2010
Corn ethanol will never be the answer as it cuts into our food supply. If we end subsidies ethanol will live or die on its own and I believe it will die.

Submitted by leewolf at: November 19, 2010
I think the primary problem with Ethanol and Washington District of Corruption is over consumption.