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Government Shutdowns Then And Now


Michael Tasselmyer
October 1, 2013

As the clock struck 12:01 this morning, the federal government found itself in a situation we haven't seen since 1996: a shutdown. Because Congress was unable to come to an agreement on how to fund certain federal agencies whose budgets depend on annual appropriations, they've been forced to "shut down", and in some cases completely halt all activity.

While the term does sound dramatic, this is actually the 18th time since 1976 that the government's been forced to temporarily shut down. The other 17 episodes have lasted anywhere from a single day to nearly three weeks, stemming from political squabbles over issues like abortion to budgetary debates that simply couldn't be settled in time.

So what will happen until Congress is able to pass a budget or agree to a short term fix? Under federal law, all government agencies are required to have official contngency plans that specify which employees and duties are "essential" and "non-essential" (or "excepted" and "non-excepted"). This ensures that the government will still act in limited ways to protect public health & safety, and it continues benefits like Social Security and certain types of assistance for veterans. The Congressional Research Service has an excellent overview of the legal issues the government must consider during a shutdown, as well as examples of how certain government services and functions were affected. Some 800,000 federal employees are likely to feel the effects of the latest shutdown either in the form of furloughs or unpaid leave. The Departments of Health and Human Services, Commerce, and Interior are expected to be among the hardest hit.

While the last shutdown in 1995-1996 may offer some precedent when it comes to how the current one might play out, there are contextual differences to consider.

  • For one, federal employment has increased substantially since then: in 1996, there were a little less than 1.9 million full-time civilian employees in the Executive branch. In 2012, that number was closer to 2.1 million, which means an additional 200,000 federal workers and their families could be affected this time around.
  • President Clinton's 1996 budget request, over which the disagreement began that ultimately lead to two government shutdowns in late 1995, included $1.6 trillion in outlays and a $196.7 billion deficit. President Obama's latest budget request, submitted in April, consisted of $3.03 trillion in outlays and a $744 billion deficit.

The charts below (using Office of Management and Budget data) illustrate U.S. spending on mandatory & discretionary programs in 2012 compared to 1996:

fy96spendingfy12spending

A major point of contention in the most recent budget battle that caused today's shutdown was how (and whether) to fund the President's health care reform law. Mandatory spending -- which includes funding for entitlement programs like Social Security, Medicaid, and Medicare -- has increased dramatically in recent years, and will likely remain a primary focus of budget debates as long as it makes up the majority of federal spending.

There is also growing concern over the amount of funding required to keep up with interest payments on America's debts. As the government borrows more to finance its existing programs, interest payments have increased significantly. So far, the government has spent about $396 billion on these payments in Fiscal Year 2013 alone, not including the month of September. In 1996, that total was $344 billion.

While the debate over budget priorities and even the shutdown itself aren't new on Capitol Hill, this time around, the fiscal trends framing the discussions are.


 

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