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Kristina Rasmussen
Blog Contributor 

Does House Oversight Hearing on Wasteful Spending Mean Hope for Taxpayers?


Douglas Kellogg
January 9, 2014

NTU Vice President Brandon Arnold offered testimony to the House Committee on Oversight & Government Reform today, making recommendations for saving taxpayer dollars and improving efficiency in government – including submitting NTU and U.S. PIRG’s bipartisan savings report, “Toward Common Ground.”

barnoldThe hearing also included U.S. PIRG’s Jamie Woo, Tom Schatz from Citizens Against Government Waste (CAGW), Chris Edwards of the Cato Institute, as well as Senators Tom Coburn (R-OK) and Tom Carper (D-DE), Ranking Member and Chairman of the Senate’s Homeland Security and Government Affairs Committee, who spoke first.

The bipartisan tone may offer some encouragement for taxpayers, who just endured a budget deal that scrapped spending caps over the next two years. All the panelists, and the Representatives who asked questions, offered pro-active proposals for dealing with wasteful federal spending. Perhaps it's just the renewing effect of a new year, but the enthusiasm and energy being focused on finally addressing the most indefensible expenditures of taxpayer money was encouraging.

Arnold urged the committee to draw from NTU and U.S. PIRG’s $523 billion in recommendations (which have a passed a bipartisan test already to simply make the report), citing examples of savings opportunities like the $1.2 billion Essential Air Service, which funds scarcely used airports, and $1.8 billion in potential savings from stopping improper Medicare payments to chiropractic services.

Arnold echoed a theme heard throughout the hearing saying, “Just one of these 65 recommendations has been enacted into law… there remains much work to be done.”

That attitude that the lack of progress in dealing with government waste was unacceptable was universal.Reps. Carolyn Maloney (D-NY) and Elijah Cummings (D-MD) asked both panels how progress can be made toward getting something done on this front.

Beginning with “low-hanging fruit,” and working to get legislation to the floor, were popular responses echoed by many as they acknowledged the challenges ahead, and failures of recent Congress’ to keep wasteful spending contained.

Committee Chairman Darrell Issa pledged to his Senate counterparts to put any legislation addressing reforms they agreed upon in the Senate Oversight Committee to a vote in the House Oversight Committee.

Arnold concluded, “Although cutting waste can limit some red ink, such efforts alone cannot solve our serious long-term debt and deficit problems. However, they can demonstrate to Americans Congress’s desire to act as a good steward of their hard-earned tax dollars.”

Whether the positive, cohesive, tone will translate into more than one of those NTU and U.S. PIRG proposals being passed by this time next year, time will tell.


 

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Submitted by Chris at: January 9, 2014
Nice job Brandon!

Submitted by geronl at: January 9, 2014
Nothing will change.